A discussion on learning and motivation

The site is fantastic at explaining the exercise and gaining access to a set of cards. After they have finished ordering them, I lay down my cards in priority order next to theirs. I then ask a series of questions in no particular order:

A discussion on learning and motivation

In fact, the methods are largely limited by the imagination of the researcher. Here I discuss a few of the more common methods. Participant Observation One of the most common methods for qualitative data collection, participant observation is also one of the most demanding.

It requires that the researcher become a participant in the culture or context being observed. The literature on participant observation discusses how to enter the context, the role of the researcher as a participant, the collection and storage of field notes, and the analysis of field data.

Participant observation often requires months or years of intensive work because the researcher needs to become accepted as a natural part of the culture in order to assure that the observations are of the natural phenomenon.

Direct Observation Direct observation is distinguished from participant observation in a number of ways. First, a direct observer doesn't typically try to become a participant in the context.

However, the direct observer does strive to be as unobtrusive as possible so as not to bias the observations. Second, direct observation suggests a more detached perspective. The researcher is watching rather than taking part. Consequently, technology can be a useful part of direct observation.

For instance, one can videotape the phenomenon or observe from behind one-way mirrors. Third, direct observation tends to be more focused than participant observation. The researcher is observing certain sampled situations or people rather than trying to become immersed in the entire context.

Finally, direct observation tends not to take as long as participant observation. For instance, one might observe child-mother interactions under specific circumstances in a laboratory setting from behind a one-way mirror, looking especially for the nonverbal cues being used.

Unstructured Interviewing Unstructured interviewing involves direct interaction between the researcher and a respondent or group. It differs from traditional structured interviewing in several important ways.

First, although the researcher may have some initial guiding questions or core concepts to ask about, there is no formal structured instrument or protocol.

Second, the interviewer is free to move the conversation in any direction of interest that may come up. Consequently, unstructured interviewing is particularly useful for exploring a topic broadly. However, there is a price for this lack of structure. Because each interview tends to be unique with no predetermined set of questions asked of all respondents, it is usually more difficult to analyze unstructured interview data, especially when synthesizing across respondents.

Case Studies A case study is an intensive study of a specific individual or specific context. For instance, Freud developed case studies of several individuals as the basis for the theory of psychoanalysis and Piaget did case studies of children to study developmental phases.

There is no single way to conduct a case study, and a combination of methods e.Motivating Students.

A discussion on learning and motivation

Print Version Intrinsic Motivation Extrinsic Motivation Effects of Motivation on Learning Styles A Model of Intrinsic Motivation Strategies for Motivating Students Showing Students the Appeal of a Subject Intrinsic Motivation Intrinsic motivators include fascination with the subject, a sense of its relevance to life and the world, a sense of accomplishment in mastering it.

Learning and Motivation is committed to publishing articles concerned with learning, cognition, and motivation, based on laboratory or field studies of either humans or animals.

Learning and Motivation - Journal - Elsevier

Manuscripts are invited that report on applied behavior analysis, and on behavioral, neural, and evolutionary influences on learning and motivation. Psychology: Motivation and Learning. discussion discussion section active learning writing collaborative learning motivation conceptual knowledge problem solving reading & composition courses analysis participation group work visual learning reading strategies role play and simulation critical thinking Full tag list.

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This is the preparation material for a Business English conversation lesson about motivation. Motivation in business is about the ways a company can encourage staff to give their best.

In this lesson, you'll see how motivation affects learning. Discover the behaviors and perspectives that relate to motivation in an educational environment.

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